Village Halls and Recreation Ground

Recreation Ground – 1930’s

The ground was loaned by the Rotheschilds for use by the villagers for sports etc. The Parish Council was responsible for the upkeep (fences, gates etc.). There were no games allowed after dusk or on Sundays. The local farmers would put ponies and some cattle to graze overnight in the Rec. When the Rotheschilds sold some of their farms and various meadows in around 1936, they offered to sell the recreation ground to the village for approximately £30.00, as the Parish Council did not want to buy it. The solicitors of the Rotheschilds in Tring were also Father Anthony’s solicitors and mentioned to him how surprised they were that the Parish Council was not taking up the offer. Father Anthony was furious, put a deposit down, called a public meeting and with full public support, money was raised to buy the ground for the village.

Article written by the LM & P Horticultural Society. Continue reading Village Halls and Recreation Ground

The Railway

A railway line used to follow a route from Cheddington station to Aylesbury, crossing the Long Marston to Wingrave road at “Marston Gate” about one mile out of Long Marston. The line was built as a branch line of the London and Birmingham, later renamed LNWR in 1846. The line was officially opened on the 10th June 1839, but Marston Gate was not opened until 1860. Continue reading The Railway

The Lost Chapel of Long Marston

At the end of a small lane in the village of Long Marston is a small churchyard. It has a few gravestones, some somber yews and a gigantic lime tree. At the northwest aspect is the remains of a moat which once surrounded the Manor of Long Marston; long since lost. Adjacent is a 16th century thatched cottage. Continue reading The Lost Chapel of Long Marston

The Last Witch Hunt

Information Taken From The Account At The Queen’s Head, Long Marston Regarding The Last Witch Hunt. In 1751 a woman was murdered in an atrociously cruel fashion by an enraged mob at Long Marston near Tring. THOMAS COLLEY the ringleader was hanged for it afterwards, but there were many who thought it hard that a man should be executed for ridding the district of a malicious witch. Continue reading The Last Witch Hunt

Cheddington Airfield

secret113large

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The old airfield is known locally both as “Long Marston Airfield” and “Marsworth Airfield”. It occupies an area between these two villages and, at it’s northernmost point, is close to Cheddington. In fact it’s official title from the war years (and the name that is used in official records) is Cheddington. This is because all new airfields at the time were named by the nearest railway station.

Continue reading Cheddington Airfield

The Pubs

In Long Marston there used to be four public houses. These were: The Boot, The Queen’s Head, The White Hart and The Rose and Crown. The Rose and Crown had another function as well as entertainment – it had a butcher’s shop and a sweet shop in it too. Now Long Marston only has two of our pubs remaining: The Queen’s Head and The Boot, which on November 5th 2003 also became our village shop. Just goes to show how things go round.

Other Happenings and History

The Weather

Unusual weather normally takes the form of heavy snow or high rainfall. But how about a tornado? Just such a thing happened on Sunday May 21st 1950. Trees were uprooted and many buildings had their roofs taken off. The noise was terrifying. A pony in it’s horsebox was lifted up to around 20ft, a arrived back down to earth unhurt. Chickens at Puttenham were not so lucky. 500 out of 700 of them were killed or went missing after the tornado picked up their hen house and transported it over a mile and a half, where it landed on another farm. Also in Puttenham a Dutch barn and a cowshed were demolished. It ploughed a total of 12 miles through Buckinghamshire. Following the tornado came hail and rainstorms. Some hailstones were up to six and a half inches round and lightning blew out the power in Long Marston. Continue reading Other Happenings and History